[Fwd: [esp-r] New edition of the ESP-r cookbook and matched exercises are now available.]

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Even if you don't use ESP-r, the new cookbook offers good
advise about modeling, especially chapters 1, 14, and 15.

On the "Publications" page under "User Manuals" of:

http://www.esru.strath.ac.uk/

Download "The ESP-r Cookbook".

or directly at:

http://www.esru.strath.ac.uk/Documents/ESP-r_cookbook_sep2008.pdf

It is good reading.

Jason

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [esp-r] New edition of the ESP-r cookbook and
matched exercises are now available.
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 07:35:53 +0100
From: Jon Hand To: CC: Jon Hand

ESRU is pleased to announce the September 2008 version of the
ESP-r Cookbook and the Exercises Volume are now availabe as
PDF files on the publications page of the ESRU web site

Below is the table of contents of the revised Cookbook.

Note: some of the new chapters (e.g. CFD) include only an
introduction
and will be completed at a later date.

-------------------------------------------------------

THE ESP-r COOKBOOK

Strategies for Deploying Virtual Representations

of the Build Environment

Jon William Hand B.Sc., M.Arch., PhD

Energy Systems Research Unit
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.

4 September, 2008

- - -

Table of Contents

Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . v
Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . vi
1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 1
1.1 Tactical approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 3
1.2 The client specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 5
1.3 Design questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 7
1.4 Model planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 8
1.5 Model coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 9
1.6 How the building is used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 13
1.7 Environmental controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 17
1.8 Model composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 20
2 Building a model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 22
2.1 Review of climate patterns and databases . . . . . . .
. . . 26
2.2 Locating constructions for our model . . . . . . . . .
. . . 31
2.3 Zone composition tactics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 33
2.4 Model topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 50
3 Geometry alternative inputs . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 52
3.1 To the keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 53
3.2 Clicking on a bitmap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 57
3.3 Examples of approaches to take . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 58
4 3D Modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 63
4.1 Modelling approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 64
4.2 Steps to create a roof space . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 68
4.3 Shading obstructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 73
5 Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 75
5.1 Scheduled air flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 79
5.2 Importing operation schedules . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 79
6 Climate data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 82
6.1 Importing climate data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 82
6.2 Defining seasons and typical periods . . . . . . . . .
. . . 83
6.3 Climatelist entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 87
7 Zone environmental control . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 90
8 Thermophysical resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 92
9 Preparation for simulation . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 94
10 Understanding performance predictions . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 97
11 Flow networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 100
11.1 Limitations of Scheduled Flow . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 100
11.2 Fluid Flow Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 100
11.3 Building blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 102
11.3.1 Flow components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 103
11.3.2 Flow connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 104
11.4 Steps in creating a network . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 106
11.5 A simple network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 108
11.6 To the keyboard... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 111
11.7 Calibrating flow models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 115
11.8 Flow control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 118
11.9 To the keyboard... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 120
11.10 Window representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 124
11.10.1 Component selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 126
11.11 Schedules vs networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 128
11.12 Limitation of Network flow . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 134
12 Detailed flow via CFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 136
13 Plant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 139
13.1 Using a component network to represent mechanical ven-
tilation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 140
13.2 Defining containments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 146
13.3 Finishing off the model and testing . . . . . . . . .
. . . 146
13.4 Moving from ideal demands to thermal zone demands . .
. . . 149
13.5 Links to zones and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 153
14 Working procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 158
14.1 How can the vendor help? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 159
14.2 Responsibilities within simulation teams . . . . . .
. . . 159
14.3 Classic mistakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 160
14.4 Planning simulation projects . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 161
14.5 Team manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 165
14.6 The quality manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 167
14.7 Simulation staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 171
14.8 The mentor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 174
14.9 The domain expert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 176
14.10 Staff productivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 178
14.11 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 179
15 Model Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 180
15.1 How can the vendor help? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 180
15.2 Responsibilities within simulation teams . . . . . .
. . . 182
15.3 Model planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 185
15.4 Complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 186
15.5 Multi-criteria assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 187
15.6 Semantic checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 191
15.7 Team Checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 193
15.8 Simulation outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 199
15.9 The model contents report . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 202
15.10 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 209
16 Install Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 211
17 Version Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 218
17.1 Text mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 218
17.2 Legacy X11 graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 221
17.3 GTK+ graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 223
18 ESP-r capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . 226
18.1 General modelling features . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 227
18.2 Zone Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 228
18.3 Building envelope and day-lighting . . . . . . . . .
. . . 229
18.4 Infiltration ventilation and multi-zone air flow . .
. . . 230
18.5 Renewable energy systems and electrical systems . . .
. . . 231
18.6 Ideal environmental controls . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 232
18.7 Component based systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 233
18.8 Environmental emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 234
18.9 Climate data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 234
18.10 Results reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 235
18.11 Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 236

- - -

ABSTRACT

This Cookbook uses the general purpose simulation
suite ESP-r as a
platform to explore strategies for deploying virtual
representations of
the built environment to answer questions posed in
the real world of
design and research groups.

The Cookbook talks about translating client questions
into virtual rep-
resentations that are no more and no less complex
than is required for
the task. It talks about re-discovering the power of
pencils and paper
and it dares to mention the word methodology. And
discovering valuable
patterns in the clutter and then learning the art of
responding to what
if questions. And since the author is professionally
paranoid you might
pick up some new definitions of the word QA.

Almost all of the strategies presented can be applied
to the task of
creating elegant virtual representations in other
simulation suites.
Readers might alert their colleagues to take a peak.

Jason Glazer, P.E.

Jason Glazer's picture
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Joined: 2011-09-30
Reputation: 0

Hello,
I am interested in learning an energy simulation software and need some advice from you experts. I am architecturally trained with over ten years experience. Unfortunately I am not trained in mechanical engineering and have only a cursory knowledge of a variety of the more common mechanical and electrical systems. I have taken quite a few lighting classes.

Which program would be the best for me in terms of balancing
a. User-friendly for an architect and
b. Robust and commonly accepted standard for LEED et al.

Thanks very much in advance for your comments!

Scott

Scott Schreffler's picture
Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 0

Sorry, forgot to add: I'm particularly interested in EnergyPlus since it has a Sketch-Up interface and I use Sketch-Up quite a bit.

Thank you.

Scott

Scott Schreffler's picture
Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 0

Scot,
If you are not interested in the most accurate results, and you want to use
it during the conceptual design period in a comparative method, I think
Ecotect could be a good suggestion. The interface is great, and it is
specially designed for architects.
Except the CFD simulation other simulation such as Lighting and energy
simulation is acceptable. And you can also export the model to other
softwares, e.g. EnergyPlus, ESP-r, Radianec, etc.

Best,
Mostapha

Mostapha Sadeghipour's picture
Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 200

Also, it's important to note that EnergyPlus is not an easy tool to use - it's powerful and flexible, but not easy. I actually use it quite a bit and like it, but I had some very good engineering teachers. The SketchUp tool is great, and if you just wanted to do sort of a loads analysis (not looking at the effects of different HVAC systems or controls, just those of layout, constructions, glazing, orientation, etc.), then you could do that within the SketchUp tool with "purchased air" systems. But once you want to start putting in any HVAC, you should get someone experienced to help you. Good luck!

Kristin M. Field, EI

Kristin Field's picture
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Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 0

Which brings us to eQuest, which does many good things..and doesn't
require relearning another program..and is LOVED by the LEED types
around the country..

Aulbach, John's picture
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