sources for material libraries

14 posts / 0 new
Last post

Dear colleagues,

We are currently assembling a material library as a basis for energy simulations and the question came up which source we should use to describe the various thermal and optical properties of typical construction materials? A natural answer seems to be to use the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 2009 Chapter 26 which lists such numbers. Are these the tables that "all" of you are using or am I missing an important resource? What about our Canadian, European and other international friends? Would you scorn at an ASHRAE library and rather use your own numbers? This data input is obviously tedious so we want to avoid having to do repeatedly.

All the best,

Christoph

Christoph Reinhart's picture
Joined: 2012-03-08
Reputation: 0

You can look at Commercial Buildings Energy Modeling Guidelines and
Procedures. Appendix D can better serve your purpose. Here is the
downloading link.

http://www.comnet.org/

Hope this helps,

javed iqbal's picture
Offline
Joined: 2012-05-18
Reputation: 0

This is an important and useful activity, especially for those of us who
are working across national or regional boundaries.
It would be helpful to know what are the sources of technical data in
places around the world. I would guess that there are
engineering manuals or handbooks equivalent to the ASHRAE HOF in many
places.

Joe

Joe Huang's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-30
Reputation: 406

Hi Joe

CIBSE (UK) quotes HOF and, to my knowledge, doesn't use any other sources.

There's a lot of manufacturer data 'in the wild'. Perhaps this is an
opportunity to create such a resource as the WINDOW/ IGDB but for opaque
elements.

Chris

Sent from my Android device. Please excuse typos, etc.

Chris Yates2's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 0

Hey Christoph

A source that is slightly dated (1989) but still interesting to read is the report titled: ?The Harmonisation of Thermal Properties of Building Materials? by Joe Clarke and colleaques (www.esru.strath.ac.uk/Documents/89/thermop_rep.pdf?). The background was to collect data to extract information on the uncertainty of the material properties as input to uncertainty propagation studies. Another potential source might be the work of Prof. John Grunewald at the TU Dresden on modelling material properties (http://tu-dresden.de/bauklimatik).

Any chance that you expand on the work of Joe with regards to deriving and publishing uncertainty data on material properties?

Kind regards,

Christian
1.

Von: bldg-sim-bounces at lists.onebuilding.org [mailto:bldg-sim-bounces at lists.onebuilding.org] Im Auftrag von Christoph Reinhart
Gesendet: Donnerstag, 16. Januar 2014 04:49
An: bldg-sim at lists.onebuilding.org
Betreff: [Bldg-sim] sources for material libraries

Dear colleagues,

We are currently assembling a material library as a basis for energy simulations and the question came up which source we should use to describe the various thermal and optical properties of typical construction materials? A natural answer seems to be to use the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 2009 Chapter 26 which lists such numbers. Are these the tables that ?all? of you are using or am I missing an important resource? What about our Canadian, European and other international friends? Would you scorn at an ASHRAE library and rather use your own numbers? This data input is obviously tedious so we want to avoid having to do repeatedly.

All the best,

Christoph

Struck Christian HSLU T&A's picture
Joined: 2012-02-06
Reputation: 0

All,

For ASHRAE 1199-RP some years ago (2003 - 2004 ish) I scrounged
around looking for material properties. Attached is a summary of
what I came up with for some common materials. As you can see, there
is quite a range of opinion for some properties for some materials
(including cases of different values from 2 different places in
ASHRAE HOF). I do not know the source(s) of those differences, in
some cases there are probably regional differences and/or changes
over time. Or maybe just bad measurements.

Moisture content is another variable of which we are all becoming
more aware. Lab measurements vs. real-building situations.

Updated versions of some of these sources are probably available.

It would be an excellent project to build up a collection of this
sort of info in some shared place, such as the IBPSA-USA Wiki
(bembook.ibpsa.us).

Chip Barnaby

Chip Barnaby's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-10-01
Reputation: 0

Hey Christoph, OpenStudio has tried to address some of this issue in the online Building Component Library (BCL) at bcl.nrel.gov. This database includes a variety of material and construction definitions used for energy simulation. The components on BCL are organized into a taxonomy and include machine readable attributes to support searching. The materials and constructions also come with premade IDF and OSM payloads so they can easily be included in EnergyPlus simulations. Rob and I have talked several times about adding content for other simulation engines to (e.g. BSDFs for fenestration constructions to use in Radiance) but we haven't done this yet. Components (and Measures) in the BCL can be made publically available or can be private to an individual user or group. Finally, the BCL has an API that software tools can use to automatically search, download, and upload components. The OpenStudio API has methods for interacting with the BCL API, the OpenStudio applications use this to allow for searching and downloading measures and components directly in the OpenStudio GUIs.

Materials:
https://bcl.nrel.gov/search/site?f[0]=im_field_component_tags%3A157

Example Material (Brick):
https://bcl.nrel.gov/node/34420

Constructions:
https://bcl.nrel.gov/search/site?f[0]=im_field_component_tags%3A127

Example Construction (189.1-2009 Nonres 1A Exterior Mass Wall):
https://bcl.nrel.gov/node/2930

BCL API:
https://bcl.nrel.gov/developer

The BCL doesn't really provide guidance on what constructions and materials to use, it is more about providing a common place to store these things and an API to make them accessible. There is a rating system so users can vote for their favorite components.

Just let us know if you'd like to know any more,
Dan

Macumber, Daniel's picture
Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 0

In Argentina we have a local standard (IRAM 11601), which specify
material's hygrothermal properties. I attached the "envelope performance
calculator spreadsheet", where there is a list of all the materials and
their properties *(in spanish!)* in case anyone is interested. IMO the
second source most widely used here would be ASHRAE Fundamentals Handbook.

Regards,
Santiago.

Santiago Velez

SantiagoVelez's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-06-07
Reputation: 0

You could also look in the EN ISO 10456 Standard:
Building materials and products - Hygrothermal properties - Tabulated design values and procedures for determining
declared and design thermal values

Regards
Paul

Paul Strachan's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 0

Chip, others,

I was thinking along that line when I posted my comment on this topic last night. What
about proposing this as an activity to IBPSA World (?) where interested chapters in each
country or region would compile their sources of material properties, and if there's
sufficient interest, the properties themselves? That would sure beat anyone in one place
trying to compile data from the whole world, although some central coordination would be
vital to make sure everyone is consistent in reporting their material properties. I would
also like to see that extended to commonly used calculation methods for heat transfer,
such as for foundation heat flows, infiltration, and two-dimensional heat transfer. In my
experience in China, every building energy code contains the same standard description of
of how to derive equivalent U-factors for thermal bridging, which is a significant heat
loss factor because 99% of the construction is heavy mass concrete, yet in the US only the
real "nerds" ever bother with thermal bridging (even I don't! ). I see many benefits from
such an activity - (1) the local chapters would get clarity on what's different (or not)
with the conditions in their country, (2) people working across national boundaries would
be able to improve their modeling (I'm always bothered by people creating "ASHRAE-90"
models for buildings in non-Western locations, as if all that differs is the climate), and
(3) we might all learn something new and unexpected.

Joe

Joe Huang's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-30
Reputation: 406

Christoph,
I like using the ASHRAE Load Calculation Applications Manual. It has a lot of the load calculation procedures and data in one easy to reference place. Plus it's from 2008 so has been updated from research projects in the proceeding 10-20 years. A lot of the building material thermal performance figures are taken directly from ASHRAE Handbook - Fundamentals though.

http://www.techstreet.com/ashrae/products/1703600

Scott P. West, P.E., LEED AP BD+C, BEAP, BEMP

West, Scott P's picture
Offline
Joined: 2013-11-26
Reputation: 0

LBNL WINDOW / THERM integration might be a good model to follow in this
respect (though I think there are some issues with the relevance of igdb
data).

Like Joe, I don't tend to work out thermal bridging.

Sent from my Android device. Please excuse typos, etc.

Chris Yates2's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-10-02
Reputation: 0

To expand on what Paul said, ISO 10456 is definitely the most relevant norm at the European level, but there are others that might be of use. Especially if you want to account for thermal bridges without using a heat transfer modeling software such as THERM: you could find a linear thermal bridge coefficient (Psi-value) in EN ISO 10211. Or you want to model ground heat transfer (ISO 13370).

European norms that are relevant to the question are the following (extracted from the French "energy code" (r?gles Th-U fascicule 4))

EN ISO 7345 - Thermal insulation - Physical quantities and definitions

EN ISO 13789 - Thermal performance of buildings -- Transmission and ventilation heat transfer coefficients -- Calculation method

EN ISO 10456 - Building materials and products -- Hygrothermal properties -- Tabulated design values and procedures for determining declared and design thermal values

EN ISO 6946 - Building components and building elements. Thermal resistance and thermal transmittance. Calculation method

EN ISO 13370 - Thermal performance of buildings. Heat transfer via the ground. Calculation methods

EN ISO 10211-1 - Thermal bridges in building construction -- Heat flows and surface temperatures -- Detailed calculations

EN ISO 10211-2 - Thermal bridges in building construction. Heat flows and surface temperatures ?- Linear thermal bridges

Le 16 janv. 2014 ? 17:44, Paul Strachan
a ?crit :

jmarrec's picture
Offline
Joined: 2013-01-09
Reputation: 0

the various ISO standards for 2 and 3D thermal simulations have a decent material list with conductivities, etc. For other, we generally use ASHRAE, etc.
-r

Russell Richman2's picture
Joined: 2013-12-12
Reputation: 0