Two heating systems in 1 zone.

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Is there a way to put two heating systems in 1 zone?

Tim Burke

T.E., Inc.
830 North Riverside Drive #200
Renton, WA. 98057
(425) 970-3753 Phone
(425) 970-3756 Fax
WWW.TEI-ENGINEERING.COM
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You can have baseboard heat plus an airside system. Only one air system can serve a zone.

David

David S. Eldridge, Jr., P.E., LEED AP BD+C, BEMP, BEAP, HBDP
Grumman/Butkus Associates

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Joined: 2016-07-15
Reputation: 200

Agreed - baseboards are my first choice for handling "oh and there's also a space heater you forgot about" and similarly simple scenarios, when that's a feasible option.

In some instances, zonal reheat can also play a role in approximating a second system, where baseboards are unavailable or otherwise in use. Caution however to consider the implications on the "terminal box" (even if it's virtual/imaginary) capacity to deliver needed heating/cooling at all hours.

There's also always the option to turn your single zone into two. It's typically not as simple post-wizards (experiences like this build foresight to draw up your zone maps to avoid the issue - we're always learning!), but is definitely do-able! You can thermally connect the two zones with an air wall to ensure ready heat transfer. Be mindful this practice can demand extra inputs (relying less on auto-sizing) to ensure adequate capacity/airflow are provided to each "sub-zone."

Also stepping back a bit for perspective - this might be a worthwhile exercise: consider whether 2 similar systems can be effectively "combined" into one for the simulation (perhaps of a 3rd type). Conceptualizing, executing, and verifying behavior for the marriage of distinct real-world systems is often a mental-hurdle the first few times, but can become a very useful sub-skillset in your energy analysis toolbox for tackling very complex situations.

~Nick

[cid:image001.png at 01D2C034.7F49EFB0]
Nick Caton, P.E., BEMP
Senior Energy Engineer
Regional Energy Engineering Manager
Energy and Sustainability Services
Schneider Electric

D 913.564.6361
M 785.410.3317
F 913.564.6380
E nicholas.caton at schneider-electric.com

15200 Santa Fe Trail Drive
Suite 204
Lenexa, KS 66219
United States

[cid:image002.png at 01D2C034.7F49EFB0]

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Joined: 2016-07-15
Reputation: 200

HI Tim,

At one time there can be only one heating system for one zone mostly.
If there is radiant heating then you can use baseboard heating as the
heating supplement in the zone.
Also one can attach the DHW heating system in the zone of the heating due
to DHW is supplied into the zone.

Thanks,
Sharad.

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Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2017 18:38:56 +0000
Subject: [Equest-users] Two heating systems in 1 zone.

Is there a way to put two heating systems in 1 zone?

Tim Burke

T.E., Inc.

830 North Riverside Drive #200

Renton, WA. 98057

(425) 970-3753 Phone

(425) 970-3756 Fax

WWW.TEI-ENGINEERING.COM

This message contains information that is confidential or privileged. The
information is intended for the use of the individual or entity named
above. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure,
copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is
prohibited. If you have received this electronic transmission in error,
please notify the sender and delete this message and any attachments

via Equest-users's picture
Joined: 2016-07-15
Reputation: 200